Schlagwort-Archiv: Jordan Why Not Zer0.1

Russell’s Jordan Why Not Zer0.1 Performance Test

I didn’t run into any issues with the traction on the Why Not Zer0.1 for nearly the entire time I was testing the shoe. Most times I’d have have a great experience without worrying at all about the grip. There were a couple of courts that had me wiping the soles free from debris every so often, which wasn’t a big deal, because the grip held in between any wiping just fine.

One court I play on regularly is what I like to call the traction killer. If I take a shoe to that court and it ends up being able to grip then I know the traction is good. This was the one time I slipped while wearing the Why Not Zer0.1 but luckily it was a single occurrence — then it was back to business as usual.

I wouldn’t recommend the shoe for outdoor use as the small nubs that make up the pattern are shallow and likely wouldn’t last too long. However, if you hoop indoors then you should be very satisfied.

Traction on the ‘Mirror Image’ colorway was so good that I can only imagine how much better the traction might bite the floor with solid rubber. Hopefully I’ll be able to get another pair in the future and see how it does.

The Why Not Zer0.1 uses full-length Zoom Air bottom-loaded into a bulky Phylon midsole. Believe it or not, this setup felt awesome — especially in the forefoot.

The midsole that rests between the bottom of your foot and the top of the Zoom unit is very thin. This is likely why you can actually feel the Zoom bounce back while in motion — a feeling that is usually lost when cushion like this is bottom-loaded.

I was unable to feel the heel in the same way as I had the forefoot, but I rarely use my heel so it’s not something that ever bothered me or crossed my mind. All I knew is that I was enjoying the hell out of the ride and had the reassurance that my heel had cushion if needed.

What I loved most is that the Why Not Zer0.1 was a great blend of stability and cushion. The Air Jordan 31 has that bounce we all hope for with Zoom Air, but at times, it felt wobbly or unstable. The Air Jordan 32 felt much more stable in comparison, but it was very stiff until broken-in (then you’d begin to feel that slight bounce in your stride). The Why Not Zer0.1 was a bit of both the Air Jordan 31 and 32; it offered all the stability of the stiffer setup without requiring quite the same amount of break-in time.

If you’ve enjoyed full-length Zoom Air hoop shoes of the past then you’ll likely reminisce a bit while wearing these. Models like the Air Jordan 12, Air Jordan 18, and Zoom Flight 96 will all ring a bell — if you’ve worn them — although you’ll notice that these weigh much less and feel much less restrictive while in motion.

We all know I’m not a huge fan of plasticy materials that are found on modern basketball shoes, but I never mind them when they feel nice and work well once on-foot. That’s pretty much where I’m at with the Why Not Zer0.1. The materials you see here are like a fuse but feel more like a vinyl. This allowed the materials to flex and move beautifully with the foot while still retaining strength and durability that you typically receive from TPU builds.

Under the vinyl-like upper is a basic mesh. It isn’t anything really special, but it’s comfortable as hell and works well with the material that’s been heat-welded onto it. Surprisingly, there were no hot spots or pinching areas for me — even with the lack of ventilation — which was a huge plus.

The shoe is definitely not premium, but it works — and works really well. I can’t speak on behalf of others, but for me, that’s a win.

I almost started the review out of my typical order just so I could go over my favorite part first — the fit is fan-freaking-tastic!

The Why Not Zer0.1 fit true to size for me both in length and width, with the width being the standout feature in the fit. The shoe feels like it vacuum seals your foot inside it without too much pressure (which would make your foot numb).

Those of you that tie your laces up tight and have been adjusting to the thin tongue era post 2008 should know that I’m talking about — that numbing foot fatigue feeling where you think that you left your foot behind you on the court had you not looked down and seen it still attached to your leg. Yeah, these don’t do that. They suck you into the upper and comfortably keep you there.

How would this feel for wide footers? That’s a great question, and one that I’m not accurately able to answer (but Duke4005 is slightly wide footed so check out his performance review). There are some shoes that you can tell some may have to go up 1/2 size in order to make work, but with a shoe built like this — with the overlay that doesn’t stretch at all — it’s hard for me to guess on what someone with a wider foot would want. Try them on in-store prior to purchasing.

Due to the vacuum seal like fit, the lockdown is incredible. If you’ve ever worn the Air Jordan XX8, with the full zipper shroud, that’s what wearing the Why Not Zer0.1 was like. I just felt secure — like I was locked in the arms of Bam Bam Bigelow (RIP). If you value a shoe that fits like a glove then you’re going to love the Why Not Zer0.1.

The design of the midsole, outsole, and the fit all play into the support nicely. The wide flat base promotes a ton of stability, while the bulky midsole acts as one of the gnarliest outriggers of all-time.

I get people closing out on me while I’m shooting all the time. With that come several ankle tweaks each week. The Why Not Zer0.1 helped when landing on someone’s foot because I didn’t roll completely over and was able to re-stabilize quickly and keep it moving — thank goodness.

That giant extended Phylon heel counter that we were all worried about: it turns out it’s awesometacular! Shout out to Jeremy Jahns! This giant heel counter keeps the heel stable and on the footbed — which is actual support for the foot/ankle. Ankle support has nothing to do with collar height — yes, I’ll continue to be a broken record on that so long as people continue to think height of a shoe equals ankle support.

This heel counter also moves into the middle of the midsole and helps stabilize it — so much so that it’s hard as hell to twist the midsole or fold it in half. I say this because the shoe doesn’t feature a shank, something I was concerned with until I played in it.

The design team was able to keep the weight of the shoe down while still keeping the midsole support strong and intact. Some may feel that the look is polarizing, but I think that’s the point. It pushes the consumer to feel some way about the shoe upon an initial look. Whether you feel that it looks good or looks strange, it’s polarizing look should intrigue most to at least walk over to the shelf and pick them up — even if it’s just to think “WTF?”

What a fantastic shoe this is. I’m not a fan of Russell Westbrook, but man, do I love playing in his shoe. It just feels…right. It’s a well balanced performer in every category.

There are so many footwear options in the PG category at the moment that there is something for everyone. Those that prefer something light, nimble, and stable while sitting low to the ground have the Curry 4. If you want something a bit stronger along the upper for the fast start and stop PG then the Dame 4 and Kyrie 4 are both great options. If you wanted a shoe that offers a bit of everything you’ll want to go with the Why Not Zer0.1.

It’s hard to believe Jordan Brand was able to start Russell’s signature performance line off with such a bang. Like adidas’ Harden line, it’ll be interesting to see if Jordan Brand can top this with Westbrook’s second shoe — perhaps we’ve seen the best it’s got from the jump.

2018 Jordan Why Not Zer0.1 Performance Review

It has been a long time since Jordan Brand blessed an athlete with a signature shoe; the last one was Chris Paul, and he is on shoe number 10. 10 years and no new blood on the market. What is a brand to do? Well, since it already has the reigning MVP on the roster, how about dropping a line for his feet.

With the plan in place, we give you the Jordan Why Not Zer0.1 Performance Review. Let’s go…

From the pattern alone, this traction should be like Peter Parker — sticking to things you don’t even really want to. It’s comprised of multi-directional blades broken into nubs running from a center line right in the middle of the forefoot. The blades should push dirt away and out while gripping the floor, and they did a great job — as long as the floor has at least a little finish on it.

On the first court I played on, I was sliding everywhere, having to wipe about every second or third trip down the floor. Granted, the floor was dirty and sucked, but you encounter all kinds of courts in life. The second floor was in better condition, and the traction was way better. Yeah, wiping was still needed, as the traction is shallow and does pick up dust (could be the translucent — I haven’t had a chance to try the solid rubber yet), but when clean and the court is workable, you’re straight Gorilla Glue.

Outside courts: don’t do it. Just don’t.

Technology-wise, the part of the Jordan Why Not Zer0.1 that has everyone’s eye is the cushioning. Full-length Zoom runs bottom-loaded and at 8mm thick it has bounce while still being low-riding. The Phylon surrounding the unit? That’s definitely going to need a little time to break that in.

The midsole felt very much like the Jordan 32, from the start and once broken in, but once it gets going and starts creasing you will get a responsive rocket ride that is low enough for quick guards and won’t hurt when you land. Zoom has been around for over 20 years, but when done right, there are very few cushioning systems that can compete with it in the basketball market.

The materials used on the Why Not Zer0.1 aren’t exactly premium, as the upper is mesh and fuse, but the way the lines are cut and layered, it works. The inner bootie is open mesh and feels great on-foot — no hot spots or harsh rubs to cause blisters — even though the ventilation is terrible and the upper fits tightly all around your foot (usually, when you combine those two traits, blisters come next).

The lacing system uses the Flightweb system that is almost exactly the same as the Air Jordan 29 under the fuse cover. Speaking of the cover, you get a thin fuse that has no stretch at all over the foot. It’s great for containment, bad for sweaty feet, but those graphics…Jordan Brand could change the whole perception of this shoe with printed graphics on the cover.

The heel counter is stiff foam and never really broke in while wearing. It was good for support but bad for getting your foot in the shoe. On the plus side, the counter/heel is lined by some seriously thick padding that helps with lockdown and keeping that counter from rubbing your ankle until you bleed.

Lastly, the tongue is 3M and the “Why Not?” graphic should be on the outside (it needs to be seen). Overall, nothing new in the materials, but dang they work.

This is serious: the fit in the Why Not Zer0.1 is almost better than Hall of Fame. What could be better? Hall of Fame plus 1? Who knows, but once your foot is in the shoe, there is no movement at all. NONE.

The length is a little long, but not enough that it affects performance (and I like a little extra length). The width is perfect for normal to semi-wide feet (mine are slightly wide), and the heel counter completely locks your ankle and rear foot in place.

The laces are a quick-pull system using the Flightweb integration and completely pull the inside mesh onto the foot. The heel counter is lined with thick padding, as is the ankle area, and it is that old-school wrap-around-the-joint-and-lock-you-in feeling.

The strap, well, it looks good, but it isn’t really needed. The Why Not Zer0.1 has internal wings that pull inside and lock in, so the strap is just extra overlay to hide the construction. Same with the foot sleeve — the graphics look great and it hides the lacing, but like the original Zoom Flight “the Glove” and the Air Jordan 28, the cover is aesthetic.

Getting into the shoe presents problems until you figure out a method. That’s completely insane, to have a “method” to get a shoe on, but ever since the KD 10 it has been more necessary than not. The stiff heel counter comes all the way to the top of the shoe and has little give. The cover has no stretch, meaning the tongue doesn’t pull out very far. Add these together, and your foot almost has to be greased to get in.

Luckily, after the first couple wears the foam in the ankle collar loosens slightly and your foot should go in way easier. If not, keep pulling and tugging — once in, the fit is like almost no other shoe out there.

Like Fit, Support is an excellent category for the Why Not Zer0.1. That heel counter, again, is big, solid, and imposing — it’s actually kind of scary. The looks lead you to believe the shoe is stiff and rollerblade-y, but the counter cuts away from the ankle joint as it rises, leaving some room for linear (straight forward) motion as you run. The strap does lock in but it’s soft and flexible, and the cut-out under the ankle strap lets you bend and move easily.

The midfoot/forefoot is supported by the lacing and the cover — and you aren’t going off the footbed in either direction. The Phylon midsole rises up over the sides of your foot to hold you tight and as it approaches the sole it flares out dramatically to give the Zer0.1 one of the largest outriggers ever.

However, it isn’t clunky; the way the tooling is molded offers a natural feel (with the edge being rounded and not cut off sharply). You really don’t notice it until you look down and see how wide the shoe looks from the top.

There is no shank plate but the sheer amount of Phylon and Zoom keep you from bending the wrong way. Don’t be scared — no shank plates could be found in shoes until ~1995 anyway. As long as the shoe doesn’t bend in the toe-to-heel direction at a drastic angle, you should be okay.

All of this structure must mean the Why Not Zer0.1 feels clunky and slow on court, right? Not at all. The transition is smooth and clean with responsive direction changes and quick jump. The full-length Zoom gives the foot a consistent platform through your step and the low ride feels fast and light.

That was a lot of words, but when a shoe is this good, words are hard to stop — just like Brodie. Westbrook has had a reputation of having a hard time finding a shoe he loves, but the Why Not Zer0.1 should fit all of his needs.

If you are looking for great fit and support, great cushioning, and (almost) great traction, you have got to check this shoe out. This is what Jordan Brand was known for when it was building a name — performance and polarizing looks. Every year, the Jordan shoe was u-g-l-y, until Mike wore them. Then everyone loved them and a legend was born.

The Jordan Why Not Zer0.1 starts off looking completely different from the other shoes on the shelf, but let the performance speak and the shoe will be proven. From guards to big men, the shoe just works. It is a basketball players shoe, and it does everything on court that a shoe should do. Kind of like a certain #0 in OKC, huh? Now it makes sense.