Implant Overdentures for the Lower Jaw

Do you know a denture-wearer who has trouble speaking, eating or achieving comfort and stability with either their upper or lower dentures? Do you know someone who avoids social situations out of embarrassment, and who thinks loose dentures are just an inevitable — and untreatable — part of growing old? Is there someone you know who hasn’t considered implants because they think they are unaffordable or more appropriate for a “younger” person implant machine?
If the person you’re thinking of is you or someone you know, we have two important facts to share with you: first, you are not alone; and second, dentures — or a full set of dental implants for that matter — aren’t your only options to treat complete or partial tooth loss. There are new solutions to this old problem.
A Bigger Problem Than You May Think
Despite enormous advances in modern dentistry, partial or complete edentulism (the loss of teeth) continues to be a major public health problem. According to the World Health Organization, edentulism is defined as a physical impairment (because important body parts have been lost), a disability (because it limits people in performing at least two essential tasks of life — speaking and eating) and a handicap (because significant changes are needed to compensate for such deficiencies). This impairment has all the characteristics of a chronic disease — it doesn’t change or abate, is incurable and requires specific management strategies to overcome its disruptive effects.
For well over a century, complete dentures have been the traditional standard of care for edentulism with its focus on replacing lost tissues (teeth, bone and gum tissues), though not necessarily function Ultrasonic Scaler. Studies indicate that most people are more satisfied with their upper (maxillary) denture as compared to the lower (mandibular) one. And at least half of all lower denture wearers will not be satisfied with their retention (stability) or comfort.
It is important to understand why this occurs and what happens when teeth are lost. It’s actually all about bone. When teeth are lost the supporting bone of the tooth undergoes remodeling (reshaping) for the first several weeks as part of the normal wound-healing process. However, this continuing process will lead to a significant loss in the shape and height of the remaining bone (known as resorption), so that dentures fitted soon after tooth loss quite rapidly become loose. The amount of bone loss is four times greater in the bottom jaw than the upper and most rapid during the first year. It is this basic biology that explains why dentures become looser over time. Lower dentures are much more difficult to wear with confidence than upper dentures. While the bone support is critical, the tongue is a powerful muscle and easily can displace a lower denture whereas the upper denture has more retention due to the large surface area and suction effect of the palate dental handpiece.

Hinterlasse eine Antwort

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht.

Du kannst folgende HTML-Tags benutzen: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>